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The Luddite Bass is an obvious next step for this growing family of Specimens. It enjoys all of the same attributes as our other Luddites: non adjustable steel truss rod; slotted headstock; 12th fret body join; no cutaway; simple control circuitry. It has a 32″ scale length and Gibson EB-style bass pickups with an additive Jazz bass-style circuit with no tone control.

Lately I have gotten away from plastic binding and begun to use wood. Believe it or not it is actually easier and less stressful to steam bend the wood and glue it to the body than it is to race the solvent-based cement as it melts the plastic binding. Aesthetically it is beautiful as well.

Click on our slideshow below for some ‘under construction’ photos taken of this newest Specimen. By the way, I am looking for a band to equip with all Luddite instruments. I think it would make an excellent stage presence.

The Gimbal Horn is Specimen’s newest horn speaker. This speaker will be mounted on the ceiling and suspended using a yoke so that it can ‘gimbal’ (or rotate up and down and side to side). It seemed to me that the space near the ceiling is underutilized real estate in many architectural interiors. The Specimen Gimbal horn will bring beauty and utility to a part of the room that is often overlooked.

This horn speaker is front loaded and therefore will project in a more direct way than the more spacial sound stage of our Specimen rear-loaded horns like the Little Horn Speakers and Liederhorns. This makes these Gimbal Horn Speakers aptly suited to front of house or PA applications.

The horn will be mounted to an aluminum yoke that suspends the cylindrical compression chamber from the ceiling. The horn can be positioned at any angle or rotated to suit the application of the room. We decided to utilize the wonderful and recently rejuvenated foundry facility at the Memphis Metals Museum. Located right on the Mississippi river bluff, it is the perfect setting for creating something using the age old technology of sand casting.

After making a wooden pattern to mount on either side of a backing board, runners and gates are added to allow the metal to flow and shrink. Sand is then packed into both sides of a two-part flask to prepare the mold for casting. Metal is then melted in a crucible inside a furnace and poured into the mold. Voila! Beautiful aluminum yokes for the newest Specimen Horns.

Below are some photos taken while I was at the Foundry casting the first yokes. Thanks to Doug Barton and Holly Fisher and everyone at the Metals Museum for all their help taking on this special project.

Below is a slideshow of photos taken during the building process. Check our my other Blog posts for more information and photos about this newest Specimen.

Gimbal Audio Horn Speakers taking shape, part 2
Gimbal Audio Horn Speakers taking shape, part 3

At the beginning of April, I spent a week at the Penland School of Crafts, where I was invited to be a visiting artist. I have hung out in many foundries and ‘smithees’ in my time, but I have never been a teacher in an iron-working class before. The class was an 8-week concentration, and when I arrived the students were at the mid-way point in an assignment involving gears and a lever—this is why I was brought in.

Even though I am not an iron worker, many of the geometries and design processes of iron work overlap with the discipline of luthiery and kinetic sculpture. Much of the time I spent with the students involved a good deal of mechanical problem-solving and the bringing of wild concepts into the physical world. For example, we logged a few hours pouring over McMaster Carr’s web site shopping for collars and shafts, springs, gears, and other raw materials. And throughout each day, we dove rather deeply into topics such as axles, rotation, spring action, turns ratios, transfer of power, and the animation of sculpted objects. We conjured up shapes and mechanisms together and it was quite gratifying to see the student’s projects begin to take flight. We also found time to make Hornlets which allowed for demonstrations of my processes and work methods.

Immediately upon my arrival, I presented a slide show of my work to an attentive audience, trying to connect the dots between my past and present. In preparation for this, I scanned 38 sketch journals and 800 slides from the last 30 years of my work. This was cathartic, to say the least. As I looked into the past, it seemed so easy to identify the recurrence of themes and shapes that I am still using today. My fascination with the octagon, for instance, began 30 years ago when I was an undergrad at the Memphis Art Academy.

The campus at Penland is like an oasis of so many different mediums: books and paper, clay, drawing and painting, glass, iron, metals, photography, printmaking, textiles, wood, and other media. The collective efforts of the entire community at Penland creates an amazing energy. This was especially evident during mealtimes when everyone stops working and gathers to eat splendid dishes prepared by the students. In the evenings after diner, we would all convene again for a slide presentation of work from various departments and teachers.

Penland is truly a magical place, and on a mountain top to boot! I think I will need to visit again.