HOLIDAY Gift CERTIFICATES  are here!

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE is December  8, 9 & 10 –  RSVP here!

Very often headstocks get broken. Very often I must fix them. I have probably repaired over a thousand and not a single one has come loose, ever.

One little trick, instrumental in closing the glue joint, is the wind up rubber technique. As a youngster I became intimate with wound up rubber strips from building model airplanes with rubber motors. I used a crank driven hand drill with a hook in the chuck to stretch and wind the motor carefully stepping forward as I monitored the tension. This would often result in magnificent flights of extreme duration. One day I was having trouble closing a particularly shattered headstock fracture when it occurred to me that I had a good-sized box of old bicycle inner tubes that could serve as a stretch clamp. Utilizing the skills obtained in my youth, I was able to close the joint perfectly and obtain a gratifying amount of glue squeeze out.

This project has been in the works for quite a while. It uses the circuit I have been dreaming about for more than a decade. Loosely speaking, the circuit is based on the 1934 Western Electric Model 91, but the front end has been modified to take a line-level input direct from an iPod if you wish. This blending of cutting edge miniature technology coupled with such antique circuitry makes me roll around on the floor with joy.

Many audiophiles maintain that this is the most linear audio circuit ever. Each monoblock puts out around 10 watts and weighs close to 60 pounds. I decided to go “all the way” with details like the engine-turned sub panels that the tube sockets mount on to. This lends a nice visual contrast and provides excellent convection ventilation for the circuit.

These amps are formidable structures and their additional expense and size (compared to my Single-ended Stereo Amp) puts them in a league of their own. However, I have never heard anything so sweet. These amps also pair beautifully with our Little Horn Speakers.

You can see images of the finished 300B Tube Amp here

This new guitar’s title is the Ãœbercaster. It is called so because I think it has everything one can possibly put on a guitar (or at the very least it has a lot).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This commission sends me in a different direction from my usual design ethos. The guitar has 24 frets with a deepened cutaway for access to the very last fret, twin-carbon fiber neck reinforcements and a chambered basswood body with a highly flamed book-matched maple cap for the lightest possible weight. It will also have two Lindy Fralin high-output humbuckers with coil taps, a Wilkinson vibrato unit with hexaphonic saddles with midi interface outputs and piezo acoustic output as well. Oh, and there is also a kill switch.

You can see the finished instrument here.